October 2015 Archives

Tucson-area students will take the test, now required for high school graduation, while still in middle school.


Improving reading comprehension is not about giving students good "strategies," it's about increasing their knowledge base about the world, a panel of experts argued.


A digital piano allows Kansas City students to study the instrument remotely.


A nonprofit that reviews curricula for common-core alignment, which came under fire after initially posting low ratings for nearly all the texts it analyzed, has tweaked its process—and consequently upped the scores for several publishers.


U.S. 4th and 8th grade students are performing worse in math, and somewhat worse in reading, than they were two years ago, according to new data from a national test.


A new study looking at the relationship between the National Assessment of Educational Progress and the Common Core State Standards for mathematics finds that the national test falls short on assessing some of the common standards.


Illinois and Montana are revising arts standards to reflect the National Core Arts Standards.


The director of Harvard's Religious Literacy Project, Diane Moore, discusses teaching religion in public schools.


A Tennessee lawmaker's bill would prevent schools from teaching students about religious doctrine before 10th grade.


The Minneapolis school district says it is immediately pulling an early-reader program that has books with racial, gender, and cultural stereotypes.


The newest round of math and reading scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the "nation's report card," are due out early next week, and some are saying they're likely to have fallen.


About 200 educators will learn more about the common-core standards, which are implemented in American-curriculum private schools in the Middle East.


Several hundred "space buffs," including students, teachers, and astronauts, gathered on the White House's South Lawn for an evening of stargazing.


Code.org says the new videos are intended to be used in classrooms across the country or just by anyone who wants a clear explanation of Internet operations.


Just four states and the District of Columbia require students to complete college- and career-ready level courses in math and English/language arts to graduate, according to a new report.


Nearly 14 percent of 3rd graders in North Carolina were "retained" last year for not meeting reading proficiency standards—but the numbers are more complicated than they seem.


The National Council of Teachers of English has hired Emily Kirkpatrick, the vice president of the National Center for Families Learning, as its new executive director.


Want to see teachers using the common science standards in their classrooms? Check out these new Teaching Channel videos.


Even a few conversations about math each week can boost students' math growth, a new study suggests.


The STEM Education Act of 2015 was signed into law today.


The U.S. Department of Education's undersecretary covered a range of topics in a one-on-one interview at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's recent learning forum.


Bill Gates says his foundation remains committed to its current work in supporting the use of high academic standards and helping teachers improve through evaluation systems that provide useful feedback.


Both public and private music teachers are spotlighted for this year's honor.


The co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is set to give the keynote address at the foundation's U.S. Education Learning Forum in Seattle.


Joe Willhoft is one of four new appointees to the panel that decides content and policy for NAEP.


A Texas mother garnered attention on Facebook for posting a picture of her son's McGraw-Hill history textbook, which said the slave trade "brought millions of workers from Africa."


Andy Weir, the author of the best-selling book The Martian, which is now a film starring Matt Damon, says his novel is a collection of word problems that teachers can use in the classroom.


A majority of parents say access to quality, hands-on STEM projects is an important factor in selecting an after-school program for their children.


More time spent in school seems to be especially helpful for Kindergartners who were already doing well academically.


Most New Jersey students get schooled in the arts, but time devoted to the subject has been dwindling.


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