November 2015 Archives

A researcher says there's evidence that the common core has affected 4th and 8th graders in at least one measurable way: It's got them reading more nonfiction.


Girls outperform boys in reading, but the gender gap shrinks when digital texts are used, according to a new analysis by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.


Finding common core-aligned textbooks is still a challenge for some California schools, even five years after the standards were adopted.


Three girls in Nebraska created an online game aimed at helping their classmates learn more about civics.


The Texas board of education shot down a plan to have a panel of university experts vet textbooks for factual errors before they are adopted.


A French publisher has designed a vending machine that dispenses short stories. Does it have utility in school settings?


Boys are more confident than girls in their ability to learn computer science, and more likely to believe they'll have a job one day in which they'll use the subject, according to new survey results from Google and Gallup.


Two new studies of teachers' experiences with the PARCC and Smarter Balanced assessments reveal a mix bag of criticism and praise.


A report from the New York state comptroller shows that 95 percent of New York City students took arts classes.


This December, in conjunction with Discovery Education and the NFL Players Association, EA Sports will release a special version of "Madden" that aims to teach math and science to 5th through 9th graders.


As fewer states choose to use PARCC's test this year, the consortium offers states more options.


A new benchmark to measure students' readiness for first-year college courses expected for majors in STEM fields shows that only 20 percent of high school students meet that mark.


Exactly what kind of test is NAEP? And where does it fit in with the dozens of other assessments and the purported overtesting phenomena that we've been hearing so much about?


With the additions of Connecticut and Michigan, one-third of states have now officially adopted the Next Generation Science Standards


The L.A. Times continues its series on arts education in the Hollywood Hills (and the rest of Los Angeles' public schools).


Concerns from arts educators, special educators, and more led the state board to put a hold on plans to change high school diploma requirements.


A group of students is advocating for the district to change its curriculum to include more diverse figures and topics.


In Jefferson County, Colorado, a school board member who said the Advanced Placement U.S. History Curriculum was insufficiently patriotic lost her seat in a recall election.


Both the House and Senate ESEA bills keep annual tests, but they go very different ways on a lot of other assessment issues.


The consortium makes public hundreds of questions from last spring's debut test, saying it hopes teachers will use them in instruction to help students understand what it looks like to master the common core.


The pool of test-takers for the Advanced Placement computer science exam is still overwhelmingly white and male, according to data from the College Board, which administers the AP tests.


Last week, a fire broke out in a chemistry class at a Fairfax, Va. high school, sending five students to the hospital with chemical burns.


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