January 2016 Archives

Today, the White House announced what it's calling an "ambitious, all-hands-on deck" initiative to get every student in the United States coding.


The Council for Economic Education's annual survey finds that fewer states are requiring economics.


Yet another study documents that states are setting higher expectations for proficiency on their tests, aiming for NAEP-like levels of performance.


NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation have released a series of short videos about nanotechnology, or the study of objects that are measured in billionths of meters.


It's been 30 years since the space shuttle Challenger exploded with New Hampshire teacher Sharon Christa McAuliffe on board.


There's been a sharp increase in the number of states that are setting expectations closer to those of the rigorous NAEP exam.


Black and Hispanic students are much more likely to have an 8th grade math teacher with five or fewer years experience than are their white and Asian peers, according to a new analysis of NAEP survey data.


Common-core math aims to have students do less memorizing—but it's being misinterpreted to have students do more, argues a math education professor.


The school district is looking to departmentalize math instruction for 5th grade students as part of a push for stronger algebra preparation.


Very few K-12 science teachers have the experience needed to teach the science and engineering practices described in the Next Generation Science Standards, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


New policies and a longer school day have helped Chicago schools give more students access to arts education.


The change was prompted by data showing that students who passed the revised GED are doing better in college than recent high school graduates.


A children's book that tells the story of Hercules, George Washington's cook and a slave, has been been withdrawn by Scholastic.


If you want to find out what math textbooks a district is using, just go ahead and ask the central office, right? According to researcher Morgan Polikoff, it's not quite that easy.


A bill in Nebraska would require high school students to take a civics examination before graduating.


James O'Keefe, the conservative activist best known for undercover video recordings that allegedly implicated ACORN workers, released a new sting video yesterday in which a Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt sales executive is heard admitting that common-core textbooks are "all about the money."


In his last State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said that "helping students learn to write computer code" is among his goals for the year ahead.


Matt de la Peña won the 2016 Newbery Medal for "Last Stop on Market Street," and Rita Williams-Garcia won the Coretta Scott King award for "Gone Crazy in Alabama."


A New York City teacher is suing the district, saying she was fired after administrators told her a lesson on the Central Park Five, who were wrongly accused of rape, might lead to riots.


For the fifth consecutive year, a state senator in Indiana is proposing that schools be required to teach cursive.


A recent piece is reigniting the common-core math homework discussion.


The move is the latest in a series of states deciding to dump PARCC or Smarter Balanced for the SAT or ACT.


Four new elements will be added to the periodic table, finally completing the chart's seventh row.


The newly revised K-12 education law lets states or districts use the SAT or ACT instead of standards-based tests at the high school level.


Students struggling with reading fluency should be asked a simple question, says educational therapist Diana Black Kennedy: "What do you want to read about today?"


Facebook commenters are praising Mark Zuckerberg for his punchy comeback to a woman's post about the advice she gives to her granddaughters.


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