August 2016 Archives

The new science tests will likely be two hours maximum and use computer simulations, according to a group of experts and state leaders who met recently.


After analyzing dozens of K-12 math textbooks—and determining that most of the major publishers were selling subpar common-core products—the curriculum review group EdReports.org has moved on to English/language arts materials.


A simple letter home to parents explaining a Texas 2nd grade teacher's no-homework policy has gone viral and is leading to more discussion about what's appropriate for elementary school students.


A survey from the National Council of Teachers of English finds that many English teachers are dissatisfied by standardized tests and have their own thoughts about how to assess students more effectively.


U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., is apparently a fan of Ken Burns' documentary "The Civil War" and thinks they can do the job typically done by teachers.


Tennessee was part of a growing number of states that planned to require high school students to pass a civics test, but the law that actually passed looks different.


The decline in scores is not unexpected, say company representatives, because more states began requiring all 11th graders take the college readiness exam.


The percentage of the general public who say they support the Common Core State Standards dropped from 49 to 42 percent over the last year, according to a new poll. But some of that may be a branding problem.


In kindergarten, there is no science achievement gap between boys and girls, according to a new study based on a large national data set. Different racial and ethnic groups showed different trajectories on science tests.


What would it feel like to take a bus tour across the surface of Mars? Some middle school students will have the chance to find out.


The Arkansas education department announced a computer science enrollment contest in the hopes of getting more students to take the subject, which is now offered at all high schools in the state.


A new analysis of NAEP data shows that just 22 percent of 12th graders say they've ever taken a computer science course, and more than half attend high schools that don't even offer one.


Achieve, the group that spearheaded the development of the Next Generation Science Standards, recently released examples for how to "bundle" the science standards, or group them together to create units.


States are beginning to experiment with standardized assessment in the arts.


Those involved in the opt-out movement said they were strongly motivated by opposition to test-based teacher evaluations and the private sector's influence in schools, the survey reported.


Fifteen-year-olds who play online video games score above average in math, reading, and science, while those who engage in social networking tend to score below average, according to an analysis of international assessment data.


Responses to PARCC's "request for information" reflect a lot of soul-searching about how PARCC will survive, and in what form.


A complaint about New Math from 1972 calls to mind many of the critiques heard over the last few years about the common core.


An early look at AP scores shows continued growth in STEM subjects and a mix of scores on individual subject-matter tests.


The U.S. Department of Education is asking people to share photos of themselves reading as part of its #ReadWhereYouAre campaign.


It's well-known there's a gender gap within science, technology, engineering, and math majors and careers, and a new study traces the moment many women give up on STEM to a single college class: calculus.


A recent study found that academic language, perspective taking, and complex reasoning can predict the kind of deep reading comprehension students need in secondary school and beyond.


A California bill would offer a seal of proficiency for California high school graduates who have demonstrated proficiency in STEM.


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