A new study of disruptions in Smarter Balanced testing finds that the problems likely caused both dips and gains in scores.


When students explain incorrect thinking they could very well be cementing their own misunderstandings, according to a recent literature review.


The new science tests will likely be two hours maximum and use computer simulations, according to a group of experts and state leaders who met recently.


After analyzing dozens of K-12 math textbooks—and determining that most of the major publishers were selling subpar common-core products—the curriculum review group EdReports.org has moved on to English/language arts materials.


A simple letter home to parents explaining a Texas 2nd grade teacher's no-homework policy has gone viral and is leading to more discussion about what's appropriate for elementary school students.


A survey from the National Council of Teachers of English finds that many English teachers are dissatisfied by standardized tests and have their own thoughts about how to assess students more effectively.


U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., is apparently a fan of Ken Burns' documentary "The Civil War" and thinks they can do the job typically done by teachers.


Tennessee was part of a growing number of states that planned to require high school students to pass a civics test, but the law that actually passed looks different.


The decline in scores is not unexpected, say company representatives, because more states began requiring all 11th graders take the college readiness exam.


The percentage of the general public who say they support the Common Core State Standards dropped from 49 to 42 percent over the last year, according to a new poll. But some of that may be a branding problem.


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