President Obama is proposing to cut the budget for the "nation's report card" by $6 million.


Two experts debate the Common Core standards in mathematics.


A new study argues that common standards won't make much of a difference in student achievement.


New AP data shed light on gender preferences across subject areas.


English/language arts teachers are arguing about the value of "close reading," a key tenet of the common standards.


President Obama's latest budget request significantly scales back funding levels for three 'teaching and learning' funds covering a variety of content areas.


Gov. Jerry Brown wants to eliminate a second year of science from the state's requirements for high school graduation.


Question: What do geography, Chinese language and culture, computer science, world history, and environmental science have in common? Answer: They're apparently becoming a lot more popular subjects in high school, at least based on one national measure. Participation in Advanced Placement tests in these subjects has grown most rapidly—from a percentage standpoint—when comparing the number of tests taken by the graduating class of 2011 with the class of 2010. That's based on my quick analysis of new data from the College Board's 8th annual AP Report to the Nation, which provides an interesting window into subject preferences...


The ten states who have won NCLB waivers outline plans to implement college- and career-ready standards.


Guest post by Ross Brenneman For those who knew "when the tripods came," the Feb. 3 death of English author John Christopher hurt. Christopher, born Samuel Youd, was a prolific science fiction writer, penning over 50 books and several trilogies. He passed away at the age of 89. While Christopher gained popularity with The Death of Grass in 1956, most kids would come to know him best from the Tripods trilogy, about an alien race that enslaves humankind sometime at the end of the 20th century. (Hopefully NASA is still on the lookout.) A young boy named Will, knowing no ...


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