Critics say the textbooks give too much credibility to the theory of evolution.


While U.S. teens understand the value of STEM, they are far less confident in the nation's ability to be competitive in math and science, a new survey shows.


EdWeek takes a special look at professional development.


Ehe Italian embassy led a fundraising drive to help restore the Advaced Placement exam and course.


Formative assessment is squishy. And squishy things don't easily yield to standardized measurement. And that creates an awkward situation in an era of numbers-driven accountability. That squishiness was on display yesterday during a panel discussion about formative assessment. (See my story for highlights of the discussion and a summary of the paper that inspired it.) The key messages being put forth were these: Don't let the push for new-age assessments mess with formative assessment, and don't forget what formative assessment really is. And what is it, exactly? According to Margaret Heritage of the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, ...


An assessment expert argues that the great potential of formative assessment to shape teaching and learning could be squandered by the two new assessment consortia.


Had enough talk about the election? Here are a few things to consider that have nothing to do with last week's events, all brought to you by teachers: • Revisit the question of whether social studies gets squeezed out of the curriculum by math and English language arts, since No Child Left Behind pegs accountability to those subjects. • Consider new approaches to assessing students' skills every day, in the classroom. Not the skills assessed by multiple-choice tests, but a broader set that is critical to their success. • Ask yourselves what can be done to avoid the utterly disillusioning experience...


The organizations argue that continued "strong funding" of basic research and STEM education programs will help ensure the nation's prosperity.


New state superintendents will be taking office in Arizona, California, and South Carolina, among other states.


Yesterday's elections shifted the political landscape to the right, and that could bring about some key education policy changes nationally and in states about academic standards and assessments.


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