If you've been following the common-standards initiative, you know that the "don't tread on me" spirit has proved to be one of the flashpoints in that work. And even now, with three-quarters of the states having already adopted the standards, we're still hearing states rattle their sabers at the feds over the common standards (headline version: "States to Feds: Stay the Hell Away From My Standards"). The federal-intrusion sentiment pre-existed Race to the Top, of course. That resentment was one of the ingredients in the implosion of earlier attempts at national standards. Keen awareness of that history shaped the name ...


A new STEM-focused school in Minnesota appears to be drawing families back to the Richfield district.


Some thoughts worth a look this morning: • A new report from the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy at Indiana University's School of Education raises flags about using the SAT and ACT to size up high school student achievement. • An EdWeek commentary takes on some of the teaching complications prompted by the common standards' cross-disciplinary approach to English/language arts. • Another EdWeek commentary writer urges readers to fine-tune their "crap detectors" as they absorb the many claims of new systems to assess student learning....


A wave of curricular responses to the common standards is building.


Delaware becomes the 37th state to adopt the common standards.


School officials decline offer by local "tea party" to provide free copies of the U.S. Constitution to students.


The liberal-arts group Common Core releases free online "curriculum maps" for the common standards.


Washington State's math and science teachers are paid less than those teaching other subjects.


Idaho this year will require all middle schoolers to complete at least 80 percent of class credits to advance to the next grade level.


The latest round of ACT scores shows how far most students--especially black and Hispanic students---have to go to be college ready.


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