Those of you who have slogged through our coverage of the Race to the Top assessment competition (story here, blog items here and here, for instance) know that those proposals are pretty hefty documents. So it's cool that the folks at the Center for K-12 Assessment and Performance Management decided to create graphic depictions of those plans. The Center, created last year and funded by the Educational Testing Service, designed graphics for the proposals submitted by the two consortia of states that are competing for the $320 million to design comprehensive assessment systems. The two consortia have reviewed and approved ...


The common-standards adoption ticker reaches 31 today with Iowa's decision to adopt. So here's your map: Iowa, you might recall, hasn't been the biggest fan of academic standards. It was the last state to give in to the state-standards movement. Now it's signed on to the common set....


Greetings, common-standards junkies. I keep waiting for the crash of the mighty adoption wave, since we are only a few days away from the Aug. 2 Race to the Top deadline (maximum points, remember?). But it could be that the RTT-driven adoptions have crested (nearly all those still in the running have adopted, as we told you when the semifinalists were announced). So in the quiet of the moment, with no updated map to post, I can feed your habit with a selection of common-standards stuff from the blogosphere. The Washington Post's "Answer Sheet" blog has thoughts from cognitive scientist ...


You've probably already heard about the 19 finalists in Round 2 of the Race to the Top competition. And if you read this blog frequently, you already know that adoption of the common standards is one of the things that gave states points—or cost them points—in that competition. So what do we see if we compare our list of Round 2 finalists with our list of states that have adopted the common standards? Nothing all that shocking, really, given the incentives that are hanging out there for adoption (federal money, great educational improvements, or both, depending on who's...


Greetings, common-standards addicts! I'm back on the Watch, and I have this to report: Florida adopted the common standards today. That brings to 30 the number of states that have adopted. Note of trivia: The Sunshine State's board of education could well win the prize for speed. Members adopted the standards in six minutes, according to a department of education spokeswoman. The unanimous vote was held via conference call. Don't let the trivia distract you from the real deal, though; Florida's adoption is significant. It's one of those states folks watch if they're trying to take education's temperature. And it ...


The District of Columbia last night became the 29th adopter of the common benchmarks crafted as part of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.


By guest blogger Stephen Sawchuk New York adopted the common standards on Monday—with so little fanfare that I missed it at first—and, of course, Massachusetts officially signed on today, with so much drama involved that it was absolutely impossible to miss. We'll soon have a full story up on edweek.org analyzing the situation in Massachusetts, so stay tuned. In the meantime, you'll want to turn your attention to the District of Columbia, which is poised to adopt the standards tonight. Including the "provisional" adoptions in Washington and Utah, we're now up to 28 states that have adopted...


By guest blogger Stephen Sawchuk The fabulous Catherine Gewertz is on vacay this week, but common standards stop for no one! And so we bring you the news that the latest common-standard adoption tally is 26 states, kind-of-sort-of, now that Washington state has provisionally approved the common content guidelines in mathematics and reading. If you're wondering what "provisionally" means, the bottom line is that state Superintendent Randy Dorn must give the legislature a final review in January 2011, complete with an analysis of the costs of implementation and a comparison of the current academic-content standards with those produced by the ...


The California state board of education is expected to vote on the common standards on Aug. 2.


Efforts are building across the country to promote computer science education in schools.


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