State assessment consortia get more money from federal officials.


There are still more developments in promoting STEM education this week (beyond Obama's call for 10,000 new STEM teachers over two years). First, the National Governors Association's Center for Best Practices today kicked off a public-private partnership with states and a business alliance called Innovate+Educate to improve STEM education through the "sharing of best practices and leveraging industry investments," according to a press release. Meanwhile, the Business-Higher Education Forum and Raytheon Company yesterday announced a set of new activities to help policymakers and educators improve STEM education. They include a package of "hands-on tools" as well as a ...


Teaching reading across the disciplines is a key challenge of the common standards, argues Core Knowledge Foundation founder E.D. Hirsch Jr.


A physics and engineering teacher at a California high school is among this year's 23 MacArthur Fellows.


President Obama calls for recruiting 10,000 new STEM teachers over the next two years.


The Texas state board of education narrowly adopted a nonbinding resolution warning textbook publishers from promoting an "anti-Christian/pro-Islamic" bias in classroom materials.


The Texas resolution appeared to have the backing of at least several social conservatives on the state board of education.


You've read here about the controversial deal that Maryland's biggest school district made with ed publishing giant Pearson to partner on an elementary-level curriculum. There's been some unpleasantness on this; most recently, the Maryland board of ed unloaded a bit of ire on the Montgomery County school system about it. Now The Washington Post is weighing in, devoting a small but valuable chunk of editorial real estate to wishing everyone could just calm down and see the deal as a win for everybody....


The new report outlines a host of recommendations to improve education and research in the STEM fields.


The nation's education publishers got a chance to get the president's ear yesterday, and here is what they said: the common standards may be great, but you need to help states afford to put them into practice. The concern about paying for the implementation of the common standards ricocheted around the room yesterday where the school division of the Association of American Publishers was holding its annual fall meeting on Capitol Hill. It was an intimate affair; only about 40 publishing executives listening to speakers outlining the education landscape. One focus was the common standards, an area that is wide ...


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