School officials decline offer by local "tea party" to provide free copies of the U.S. Constitution to students.


The liberal-arts group Common Core releases free online "curriculum maps" for the common standards.


Washington State's math and science teachers are paid less than those teaching other subjects.


Idaho this year will require all middle schoolers to complete at least 80 percent of class credits to advance to the next grade level.


The latest round of ACT scores shows how far most students--especially black and Hispanic students---have to go to be college ready.


Vermont becomes the 36th state to adopt the common standards.


A few things to read on a slow August morning: • A new report from the Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard. It profiles the leadership of 15 public high schools, tracking the things they did to make their schools standouts. • A recent survey by Achieve that finds broad support for the college and career-ready agenda. • Announcement of a plan by the Institute of Education Sciences to study ways to link NAEP results to international assessments. (NAGB, which oversees NAEP, mentioned a little something about this in the spring, as well.)...


Idaho officials are planning to scrap a requirement that students pass a high school science exam to earn a diploma.


The common-standards initiative is in transition. For a while, it was all about development. The next wave was about state adoptions. Now states and districts are trying to figure out how to turn the standards into teachable stuff for kids. In that spirit, Kathleen Porter-Magee, over at the Fordham Institute's Flypaper blog, cautions the field not to take its eyes off the accountability ball while it obsesses about implementation. Without setting clear student achievement goals and holding people accountable for the outcomes, she says, it will be "easy to ignore good curriculum." We've talked a lot in this space about ...


If you've been following the common-standards coverage in this blog, you know that Aug. 2 was a big-deal day, because states vying for Race to the Top money got maximum points if they had adopted the standards by then. When the RTT Round 2 finalists were announced, we noted that nearly all states that had won a grant (in Round 1) or were still in the running for one (Round 2) had adopted the standards. Then it came down to one: Delaware was the only one of the RTT winners or contenders that had not yet adopted the common standards. (It...


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