The school board for the Portland, Ore., school system recently adopted a resolution saying it would stop using instructional materials that cast doubt on climate change—a move that some national groups have labeled censorship.


New federal data show that black and Latino students are not getting equal access to the high-level math and science classes that are a gateway to college.


Since Arizona added the citizenship-test requirement in 2015, 12 additional states have followed suit. The Joe Foss Institute is hoping to reach all 50 states.


Education Week spoke with Matt Larson, the new president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, about his priorities and what he thinks are some of the biggest issues facing math teachers today.

Michigan is the latest state to consider allowing students to replace foreign language classes with coding classes.


The New York state education department announced it was releasing 75 percent of the multiple-choice items from its 2016 common-core-aligned math and English/language arts tests, up from 50 percent last year.


The drag-and-drop coding apps and tutorials that many K-12 schools use to teach students the beginnings of code may be entertaining, but they don't mimic the work real computer scientists do, argues the CEO of an ed-tech company.


A Florida teacher is preparing students for advanced math competitions during the school day—and it's paid off to the tune of nine national championships.


The White House Turnaround Arts Initiative, which started in eight schools in 2011, will expand to 68 schools.


Republicans are 90 percent more likely than Democrats to oppose the Common Core State Standards, according to an analysis of California poll data. And most of that opposition is explained by disapproval of President Obama's performance.


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