Amid state and local budget cuts, South Carolina is seeing a decline in the number of single-gender classes offered at public schools.


As comments pour in on the common standards, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute here in Washington is weighing in with an analysis of the draft. Its report, issued today, gives the math standards an A-minus and the English/language arts a B. That's an improvement over the last time the organization checked into the drafts that have been produced and refined as part of the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Last fall, Fordham had its experts pore over an earlier draft and gave B's to both math and the ELA. (See our story here, which links to that study.)...


Two new studies look at the barriers women and minorities face in entering the STEM fields.


Comments are flooding in on the common standards, but the public probably won't get to see them.


The sharpened national focus on career and college readiness has prompted many questions about what both of those terms mean. Despite some protestations to the contrary, there is still something less than, ahem, total agreement on what constitutes sound preparation for college or for good jobs (there are so many types of colleges, and so many careers!). While those folks yak about overlapping sets of skills and such, you might be interested to peruse a document that tries to capture what America's "vision" of career technical education should be as we drag ourselves move boldly into the 21st century. Issued ...


The House today passed a bill to enhance environmental education.


I'm sure you remember, because it set a lot of people's neck hairs on end, that President Obama recently proposed that Title I funding for disadvantaged students be tied to whether states have adopted the Common Core State Standards. And I am also sure you know that in order to get the most bang for their buck in Race to the Top applications, states have to promise to adopt the common standards. In the Title I proposal, states may choose the common core standards or work with their own university systems to build standards rigorous enough to be considered "college ...


"All students college and career ready" is getting to be a veritable mantra among educrats, with "all students proficient" joining cassette tapes as quaintly outdated. If you've somehow napped through the steady flow of rhetoric coming out of the Obama administration in the last year and you want proof of this college-and-career-readiness drumbeat, you need go only so far as the president's recent blueprint for reauthorization of the ESEA (currently known as No Child Left Behind). (See our story here.) What does the career readiness part of all this mean, though, and how would it manifest itself in schools? Some ...


Florida legislators are eyeing a measure to require a 7th grade civics course, and to impose a new high-stakes test in the subject.


It's taken a few days to sink in, it seems, but I'm starting to see some opinion pieces appear in various newspapers and in the blogosphere about the controversial actions last week by the Texas state board of education to revamp its social studies standards. As I wrote the other day, the debate has been infused with political, racial, and religious tensions. The board gave preliminary approval to the revised standards on a party line vote of 10-5 last Friday, with all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed. The board may well make additional amendments before taking a final ...


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