If you have been following the wave of adoptions of the common standards, you might well wonder what the elections this week will hold for their future. As my colleague Erik noted below, this election is really worth watching for its potential impact on education. Even though 41 states have adopted the common standards, who knows what will happen to the commitment to put them into practice when new governors, state boards, state lawmakers, and state education chiefs arrive? The folks over at ASCD take a look at a few places where changes could affect the common standards. Our intrepid ...


From congressional races and gubernatorial campaigns to ballot measures, Tuesday's elections are important for the future of education policy and funding.


The webinar on testing ELLs is hosted by the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition.


Yes, common-standards watchers, we have a new map for you. The Oregon board of education voted today to approve the common standards, making it the 41st state (including the District of Columbia) to do so. So this is what your Common-Standards Nation looks like now:...


The Education Department issues new guidance on bullying, saying that some types of harassment based on sexuality or religion might constitute a federal civil rights violation.


The Institute for Research on Mathematics and Science Education will bring together top scholars to tackle challenges from 7th grade through the college level.


The editorial draws on the recent National Academies report, "Rising Above the Gathering Storm, Revisited."


A new study documents substantial gaps among states in what they expect students to master.


Recent papers and discussions explore high school students' weak skills in writing and research.


A court ruling this week held a potent message for teachers: you can't use the First Amendment to defend your curricular decisions. The federal appeals court ruling out of Cincinnati notes that the school board has the ultimate right to set policy in that area, and to fire teachers whose choices fly in the face of that policy. Other readings of interest this week: • College admissions: The National Association of College Admissions Counselors released its annual report on college admissions, confirming what many of us already know: students are applying to more schools, and they're doing more of it online....


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