The mass migration from Chicago to Washington sparked by President Obama continues, it seems. We're a little behind the times on this one, but Michael C. Lach, who previously oversaw high school curriculum and instruction in the Chicago public schools, in November joined the U.S. Department of Education as a special assistant focused on STEM issues. (Among the many other migrants from Chicago, of course, is Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, the former schools chief in the Windy City.) Lach will be speaking late this afternoon at a Washington conference on math and science learning hosted by the National ...


Funny or scary? You be the judge. The Texas board of education bans the author of the children's book Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? on the mistaken belief that he wrote a book critical of American capitalism. (Hat tip to Robert Pondiscio over at the Core Knowledge blog.)...


High school students took to their computers last week, but it wasn't to chat on Facebook. This time, they were applying constitutional principles to the issue of gay marriage. The video conference with students from high schools around the country was part of a program called The Exchange. Based at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, it brings together high school students in moderated debates about important issues of the day. The idea is to help them learn to "do democracy" by engaging in civic deliberation. Previous programs have explored how to balance students' rights with school safety and whether ...


A U.K. study finds that children who text regularly improve their literacy skills.


Indiana's governor is backing legislation to end "social promotion," but it appears likely to face some serious obstacles.


A key House committee is gearing up to reauthorize the America COMPETES Act, which promotes STEM education.


What does it mean when far more high school teachers think their students are ready for college than do the college instructors who teach them? It means we have a pretty big disconnect between what high schools think is needed for success in college and what actually is needed. This is not exactly news. We know there are many reasons that high school students fail to make it to college, or fail to thrive once they're there. But a new survey of thousands of high school and college teachers, conducted by ACT Inc., fleshes out a few of the key ...


The Race to the Top applications turned in yesterday offer an interesting preview of what might be in store as states move toward adopting common standards and common assessments aligned to those standards. (You might remember that they have a better shot at getting RTT money if they promise to do those things, and offer evidence that they are actually committed to doing them.) States' applications for this money are gargantuan pretty lengthy. But a little guided tour through the specific sections in a few of the applications, in which they discuss their plans for common standards and common assessments, ...


Arkansas finds that 58 high schools gave inflated grades to 20 percent or more of their students.


The common academic standards in math are still in the nonpublic draft stage, but that doesn't stop people from talking about them. They were the featured topic of a panel discussion at the annual joint meetings of the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America in San Francisco this past weekend. One of the panelists, William McCallum, tells me that the idea was to facilitate a lively discussion among panelists and attendees about the proposed standards. The organizers thought the draft would be public by the time of the meeting this past Saturday. But the timeline slipped a ...


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