A new study finds that more states are using online state assessments already, or plan to be doing so in the near future. The study also found that state education leaders are really interested in open-source platforms for state accountability testing. Researchers for the study interviewed officials in educational assessment and technology offices in 27 states, as well as "opinion leaders" from the public and private sector. They found that 23 of the 27 states were already conducting state assessments online, or will soon be doing so. Educators cited easier logistics, quicker data turnaround, and the option of more customizable ...


In the same spirit as my post yesterday, which offers up at least a teensy slice of the feedback on the math portion of the common standards, here are some responses to the English/language arts section. Some of these have been formally submitted on the initiative's website as feedback during the public comment period (which ends today). Others have been issued by their organizations to contribute to a public dialog, but have not been officially submitted as common-core feedback. Keep in mind that many organizations are not submitting feedback online during the public-comment period because they already shared their ...


As the obituaries and tributes pouring out make plain, Jaime Escalante made a big mark in education.


A group of mathematicians has come out with a critique of the proposed common standards, which are undergoing their final few days of public comment this week. (Friday is the last day of the public-comment period. You can post your feedback on their website by clicking the little yellow bar in the left column.) As I have said before, it would be a valuable service to make public all the comments on the K-12 common standards draft. More than 5,000 have been submitted so far. But the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association, which ...


Both Delaware and Tennessee featured STEM education in their successful Race to the Top applications.


We've been writing it over and over: Forty-eight states have agreed to support the common-standards push. The two exceptions are Texas and Alaska. Is that about to change? It seems that educators in Alaska are discussing whether to adopt the standards....


As you know, the common standards are up for public comment through the end of this week (more than 5,000 comments so far, sources tell me). While lots of debate has focused on whether the standards cover the right stuff, whether their level of rigor is appropriate, and whether they were developed in a sufficiently transparent way, a bit less conversation has centered on the standards' potential as a business venture. Not that no one's talked about it. The potential profits to be made from designing curriculum materials and assessments for the standards have been a trigger for skepticism ...


Three in four Florida teachers say they are comfortable with the inclusion of evolution in the state's recently revised science standards, a survey finds.


You may have heard a little something this week about President Obama winning changes to the U.S. health-care system. What you might have missed amid the hoopla and the hollering is a couple of provisions tucked into the legislation to fund abstinence-only education and comprehensive sex education at a cost of more than $600 million over five years. The health-care overhaul essentially gives a new lease on life to the Abstinence Education Grant Program, which has been around since the 1990s but recently was zeroed out with backing from President Obama. It provides grants to states for initiatives that ...


Questions persist about the effect of exclusion rates on NAEP scores.


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