Race to the Top assessment consortia merge into three groups.


A new study finds key costs savings for assessment systems that tilt more toward essays and performance-based items.


A new EdWeek commentary explores what the advent of digital textbooks and related media likely will mean for districts and schools, with some cautions about getting caught up in the e-hype. "What the shift to electronic readers and e-texts portends needs close inspection, with an eye to the impact on teaching and learning, not dreaming or even optimism," writes Gilbert Sewall, the director of the American Textbook Council. On one hand, he says: "[D]igital textbooks offer teachers and districts the chance to break out of standard lessons and use something better. Increased competition and open-source instructional material challenge the ...


By guest blogger Michele McNeil, cross-posted from the Politics K-12 blog: The U.S. Department of Education has given the green light to the $350 million Race to the Top assessment competition, which will award grants to groups of states to create rigorous common tests to complement the common standards effort already underway. The $350 million is part of the larger $4.35 billion Race to the Top Fund grant program. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced in June 2009 he wanted to peel off $350 million to help states create the "next generation of assessments." According to the final ...


Colorado is hosting a summit this week on improving students' personal financial literacy.


School officials in Elko County, Nev., are trying to get a refund for state history textbooks, amid concern with grammatical problems and complaints that the books are racist.


The public-comment period for the proposed common standards has closed. At some point soon, we will get a summary of the 5,000-plus comments the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association received on the K-12 standards. In the meantime, as a continuation of my blog entry from last week, I'm posting a couple more examples of feedback submitted on the math portion of the common standards: Here is what the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago submitted, and here is what the U.S. Coalition for World Class Math submitted....


New teacher-quality grants will help expand the UTeach program to Cleveland State University and support a math initiative in the South Bronx.


A new study finds that more states are using online state assessments already, or plan to be doing so in the near future. The study also found that state education leaders are really interested in open-source platforms for state accountability testing. Researchers for the study interviewed officials in educational assessment and technology offices in 27 states, as well as "opinion leaders" from the public and private sector. They found that 23 of the 27 states were already conducting state assessments online, or will soon be doing so. Educators cited easier logistics, quicker data turnaround, and the option of more customizable ...


In the same spirit as my post yesterday, which offers up at least a teensy slice of the feedback on the math portion of the common standards, here are some responses to the English/language arts section. Some of these have been formally submitted on the initiative's website as feedback during the public comment period (which ends today). Others have been issued by their organizations to contribute to a public dialog, but have not been officially submitted as common-core feedback. Keep in mind that many organizations are not submitting feedback online during the public-comment period because they already shared their ...


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