It's taken a few days to sink in, it seems, but I'm starting to see some opinion pieces appear in various newspapers and in the blogosphere about the controversial actions last week by the Texas state board of education to revamp its social studies standards. As I wrote the other day, the debate has been infused with political, racial, and religious tensions. The board gave preliminary approval to the revised standards on a party line vote of 10-5 last Friday, with all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed. The board may well make additional amendments before taking a final ...


The first public draft of the common standards is out, as you know from reading edweek.org and this blog. But states don't have to put their feet to the fire on this thing yet, since it isn't the final version. (That won't happen until after the public- comment period closes on April 2 and revisions are made based on that feedback.) So far, the fact that the draft has been a work in progress has allowed states to demur about whether they will adopt the common standards. A popular line has sounded something like this: "Check back with us ...


President Obama's plan to revise the Elementary and Secondary Education Act could have some potentially significant implications for curriculum matters across the country.


The Texas board of education by a vote of 11-4 gave its preliminary approval to new social studies standards.


A professor is urging that the popular STEM acronym expand to STEAM with an "A" for the arts.


A new business and industry coalition to be announced tomorrow is seeking to enhance and elevate the U.S. commitment to STEM education


If you don't live or work here in Washington, it could be hard to wrap your head around the intense inside-the-Beltway mentality that shapes dialogue around here. But since our office is inside that Beltway, for better or worse, it came as no surprise that I was inundated with official statements yesterday about the first public draft of the common standards. Most were fairly predictable, of course, given their long-standing agendas or their roles supporting the project (or the politically sensitive prospect of saying anything nasty about the standards). See statements from Achieve, the Business Roundtable, the Alliance for Excellent ...


The Texas Education Agency is criticizing Fox News for its coverage of efforts under way to revise the state's social studies standards.


A new study finds that scientists' initial interest in their subject is often sparked before they enter middle school, a conclusion the researchers suggest has implications for rethinking policy efforts aimed at getting more young people to become scientists. The federally funded study examines the experiences reported by 116 scientists and graduate students that first engaged them in science. Sixty-five percent said their interest began before middle school. Women were more likely to report that their interest was ignited by school-related activities, while most men recounted self-initiated activities, such as conducting home experiments or reading science fiction. The early interest ...


There is an interesting mix of reactions taking shape to the first public draft of the K-12 common standards. (Yes, these folks viewed advance, embargoed copies, or already had the draft because it's been circulated among state leaders.) Check out our story on www.edweek.org, and check back again at 10 a.m EST., when we will link you directly to the drafts. UPDATE: The links to the drafts are now available on our story....


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