State boards of education seem to be lacking a good deal of information about the proposed common-core standards. And in most states, these panelists will be the folks who will have to decide whether to adopt them. That message emerged clearly from Day 2 of a meeting of Western board members I attended this week in Las Vegas, organized by the National Association of State Boards of Education. (See my blog post from yesterday about Day 1.) About a dozen states had representatives attending the meeting, and they spent a chunk of the morning discussing the questions they have about ...


A recent study finds that 2005 high school graduates earned more credits in "STEM" courses than did their counterparts from 1990.


States that adopt the common standards must adopt 100 percent of the document, according to two officials working on the initiative. This clarification emerged yesterday from a meeting in Las Vegas organized by the National Association of State Boards of Education. NASBE is holding a series of these meetings around the country so state board of ed folks can discuss the initiative, which 48 states have signed on to support. During yesterday's discussion, one question sought to clarify the requirement that participating states achieve an 85 percent match between their state standards and the common standards. (This is a requirement ...


An experimental, abstinence-only approach to sex education can delay young teenagers from engaging in sexual activity, a new study finds


This morning, I blogged about President Obama's budget proposals for 'STEM' education. Next, I'll turn to his plans to consolidate a bunch of discrete programs into two larger funds, one for literacy and the other for, yes, a "Well-Rounded Education." (With a name like that, what's not to like?) First, the $450 million literacy fund (dubbed the Effective Teaching and Learning: Literacy Fund). This program would provide competitive grants to "support comprehensive state and local efforts aimed at improving literacy instruction, especially in high-need schools," says the U.S. Department of Education's budget summary. It would essentially replace seven existing ...


The White House describes it as money for grants to states to improve teaching and learning in the subjects.


Alaska's governor is looking to use a new college scholarship program as a lure for students to complete what he calls "a more rigorous" high school curriculum.


The Diary of Anne Frank is pulled from a school's reading list because a parent complains about its sexual themes.


Experts this week discussed the importance of math learning in early childhood at a gathering on Capitol Hill.


The revision process for the draft K-12 common standards offers a glimpse into the difficulty of crafting skills-and-knowledge sets to everyone's satisfaction.


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