A report by the National Research Council examines the many challenges facing high school chemistry teachers—and offers ideas on how to overcome them.


Teachers, researchers, undergrads, grad students, and assorted policy types looking for some summertime reading might be interested in a new resource on math and science being offered by EdWeek. It's a collection of recent stories called "Spotlight on STEM," which can be downloaded in PDF form for the price of $4.95. EdWeek has offered these packages of stories on other topics, such as "response to intervention" and tips for new teachers, but this is the first one we've put out on math and science topics. For those who are interested in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education ...


A number of evolution-related bills died in state capitols around the country. Somewhere, Richard Dawkins is smiling.


What Michael L. Kamil, a reading researcher at Stanford University who was a guest on an EdWeek live chat today on adolescent literacy, has to say about free reading may surprise you. A transcript is now available. Here was the question: "What is your opinion of allowing students time in class to read what they want, instead of following a rigid, prescribed reading plan?" Kamil gave the following answer: The research on free reading, reading practice, or recreational reading shows that having students read more does NOT lead to better reading. Instead it seems to show that good readers read ...


If you're one of those people who's still struggling to master the most basic functions on your cell phone (like send, receive, and check messages), you may not want to continue with this blog post. What it says may depress you. As you sort through your technological shortcomings, it turns out that two young men in suburban Chicago—a 9-year-old and an 11-year-old, to be precise—have developed an application for an iPhone that allows users to solve math problems on the device. It costs 99 cents to download the application, according to this story describing their application, in the Chicago...


Michael L. Kamil, a prominent researcher on reading, will join us today for a live chat on how to improve adolescent literacy. It will take place from 1 p.m to 2 p.m., Eastern time. Find more information here....


A former school textbook editor describes the process that most textbook publishers use to create textbooks as stifling for engaging and original content.


The success of Rosetta Stone, a language-software company, on the New York Stock Exchange indicates that many people in this country want to learn a foreign language.


Two stories in today's newspapers highlight efforts to improve math and science education in major cities, one of which is well under way in Los Angeles, while the other is just getting off the ground in Detroit. A story in the Los Angeles Times describes a pilot program taking place in six schools in the city that aims to boost students' interest in computer science. So far, it seems to be having success reaching minority students, according to the story. Over the last five years, the program helped double the number of African- American students taking Advanced Placement computer science ...


At a hearing of the House Education and Labor Committee this morning, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said he would like to increase funding for the federal government's Striving Readers program from $35 million to $370 million per year. He said he also wants to extend the program from operating only in middle and high schools to elementary schools. (It's likely that he's referring to the upper elementary school grades that weren't covered under the federal Reading First program. A draft bill is circulating in Congress that could provide a program that could be a replacement for Reading ...


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