Roughly a year after the National Mathematics Advisory Panel released a major report on teaching and learning in that subject, two people who served on the panel will answer questions in an Ed Week forum. It's an online "chat" to be held tomorrow, Tuesday, at 2 p.m. ET. One of our guests is Francis M. "Skip" Fennell, former president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. The other is Vern Williams, a math teacher at Longfellow Middle School in Falls Church, Va. You can watch the chat and submit questions (try to keep them short!) up to a ...


Two reports have been released in the last few days that stress the need for states to have a statewide focus on adolescent literacy. Both reports challenge the traditional assumption that reading instruction in schools should end at grade 3. They emphasize that quite a lot of research is available on teaching strategies for reaching struggling readers in middle or high schools. A report by the Southern Regional Education Board released on Friday at the Education Writers Association annual meeting calls on states to enact policies to support adolescent reading. See my article, "Southern States Urged to Tackle Adolescent Literacy," ...


Officials at the College Board say they are ready to adjust testing schedules for the Advanced Placement tests in case local school officials decide to close their facilities because of the outbreak of H1N1, otherwise known as the Swine Flu. As of this afternoon, about 300 schools around the country had closed out of concerns that the virus may spread. (See Ed Week's full coverage on the issue here. UPDATE: The U.S. Department of Education reported later today that 433 schools had closed, affecting 245,000 children in 17 states.) Officials at the College Board, which sponsors the AP, ...


One interesting sign of academic progress on the latest "nation's report card" results came among students who are presumably at a pretty serious disadvantage. Math scores for students who reported that their parents didn't complete high school rose on the NAEP from 287 to 292, on a 500-point scale, the biggest jump of any student group, as measured by parents' educational background. Overall, 17-year-olds' scores were flat among students in every performance level. By contrast, among students who said at least one parent had graduated from college, and those who said either mom or dad had "some education after high ...


Advocacy organizations and policymakers have sought to encourage more students to enroll in Advanced Placement classes, a popular college-prep track, in recent years. Yet teachers are torn about whether all interested students should be allowed into those classes, or only those who meet certain academic pre-qualifications, as my colleague Stephen Sawchuk explains in a new story. He's reporting on a new survey released by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute....


Interesting changes appear to be in the works for the state of Texas' accountability system, according to this story in the Dallas Morning News. The proposed changes, included in legislation moving through the House and Senate in Austin, would require students to meet new, higher college-readiness standards in English and language arts. But at earlier grades, the bills also would allow schools to promote students on a combination of factors, including test scores, grades, and teacher recommendations, as opposed to simply state test scores, according to the story. And state performance ratings of schools would be changed to consider growth ...


My colleague Alyson Klein reports on yesterday's hearing by the House Education and Labor Committee on common standards in "House Panel Considers Federal Role in Standards." Former North Carolina Gov. James B. Hunt, Jr., testified that the Congress could help keep states' efforts to create common standards on track by asking for regular reports and for seeing that the states meet the deadlines that they set out for themselves. He said that Congress could also provide funding for the effort. Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon, the top Republican on the Committee, argued that the states are capable of creating common ...


An objective observer looking at course-taking patterns in middle and high school math in the United States, as shown in national data released this week, could argue that this country's students have made enormous strides. Thirteen-year-olds are more likely to take introductory algebra today than ever before: 30 percent of them reported being enrolled in that class today, as opposed to just 16 percent two decades ago. Thirty-two percent said they're taking prealgebra, compared with 19 percent in 1986. Precalc or calc? Among 17-year-olds, 19 percent report having taken that class in high school, while just 6 percent could make ...


Certainly attending a school that emphasizes green or environmentally friendly habits and processes is going to have an impact on students' awareness of such issues. But preteens at Merrill Middle School in Des Moines, Iowa, who participated in a recent survey about their commitment to conservation seem to be walking the walk in their everyday lives as well. The 140 students, between 10 and 12, describe in detail how the environment, and the value they give to conservation efforts, influence their day-to-day activities. They may be at that age when many youths are seen as self-absorbed and unfocused, but this ...


The long-term trend data for the National Assessment of Educational Progress was released today and the news is not good for students in high school. Average scores have remained flat for 17-year-olds both in reading and math since the early 1970s, when the assessments were first given. The scores for 17-year-olds in reading, however, did increase by three points, to 286, from 2004 to 2008, which is considered significant. But the same was not true for 17-year-olds in math. The scores remained stagnant for that age group in math during that same period. Written statements are starting to flow into ...


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