Over at Digital Education, Kathleen Kennedy Manzo features online lessons about world hunger created by the United Nations World Food Program. She suggests that the lesson plans, blogs, videos, interactive games and other resources hold more promise of helping children understand world hunger issues than the standard reminders that parents use to urge kids to clean their plates at dinner. (You know the typical words: "Eat your vegetables. Children without food in India would be really happy to eat those.)...


Students encounter science every day, outside formal classroom settings. These informal experiences—which occur in zoos, museums, on walks through the park, even in computer games—offer the potential to increase students' understanding and love of science, a study released earlier this year found. Next week, at 1 p.m. on June 9, EdWeek is hosting an online chat on informal science education, which will allow readers to submit questions to researchers who've studied the topic extensively. Our guests will be Philip Bell, of the University of Washington, and Heidi Schweingruber of the National Research Council. Both of them worked...


The key to U.S. students competing with Asian and European peers? Ground them in the arts and humanities, not just reading and math, a new report by Common Core argues.


Actor Richard Dreyfuss is in the media limelight today for his interest in creating a curriculum to teach civics to students in grades K-12. Former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, a Democrat from Florida, has a similar interest in seeing civics stressed more in schools and in colleges and recently wrote a book, America, The Owner's Manual, on how this can happen. He wants to see youths get engaged in politics. Dreyfuss characterizes civics as "political power." He fears that the nation's young don't understand well the origins of the United States and would like his new curriculum to help ...


Students from the Silver Spring International Middle School got a chance to see films they'd made in an elective class at school on the big screen this morning at a film festival at a local movie theater. The movies were made as part of the class, "Lights, Camera, Literacy!," that is taught in 15 schools in the Montgomery County, Md., district as part of a middle school reform effort. That reform effort aims to make academics more engaging for students. George Mayo, an English teacher who taught the elective class at Silver Spring International to 84 students this school year (and...


Several Texas lawmakers have already made their dissatisfaction known with the performance of the state board of education and the recent saga over evolution's place in the state standards. Now members of the state Senate have succeeded in blocking the reappointment of the board's controversial chairman, Don McLeroy. McLeroy, a dentist from College Station who joined the board in 2007, pushed for standards that encouraged more criticism of evolution and many core components of the biological theory. As self-described creationist, according to media reports (see this story from the Austin American-Statesman) he played a major role in the 15-member state ...


Private and public funders of adolescent literacy convene in the nation's capital to talk about their priorities for the future.


Obama pledges to use the resources of the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy to boost students' knowledge of and interest in renewable energy. Can it work?


One of the carrots meant to lure college graduates, and career changers, into math and science teaching is loan forgiveness, a form of assistance offered by states, nonprofits, and the federal government. Whether these programs actually have an impact on creating a sustained pool of talented teachers is a matter of dispute. But it's probably a safe bet that for some aspiring teachers, particularly those thinking of forgoing higher-paying gigs for the classroom, the promise of paying off their college debts—especially if the debts rise as high as $50,000 or $70,000—means something. A story in yesterday's...


Alaska is creating a new director of rural education, who will also focus on serving the state's native population. Several other states have administrators who work specifically with American Indian students.


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