College Board officials have confirmed that they are working on a pre-PSAT, a voluntary assessment for 8th graders designed to gauge their progress toward success on the college-entrance exam and beyond. The Los Angeles Times broke the story Friday when an official with the New York City-based board discussed it at a conference, not realizing a reporter was in the room taking notes (don't you love when that happens?). The board would not give Ed Week details, but said an announcement and more information should be ready in the fall. "It’s designed to provide schools with insight about students’ ...


It's hard not to get drawn in to the record-breaking heats in the Olympic swimming competition, or the excitement of the early matchups in soccer and basketball. But before you get all patriotic about the dozen or so medals the United States has already won in Beijing this month, you might temper your enthusiasm with two different takes on international competition. Here Bob Wise of the Alliance for Excellent Education weighs in with his second broadcast of the "Education Olympics," as he shares disappointing data on where the U.S. stands against other nations on literacy measures. And Fordham's Mike ...


There's been a growing interest in recent years in holding U.S. students to a higher standard—specifically an international standard. As we've reported, more state policymakers and researchers seem attracted to the idea of states judging their academic progress against foreign nations by competing directly with them on international exams. But Mark Schneider, the commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics, recently spoke about the difficulty of making those state-to-nation comparisons at a meeting with federal oficials in Washington. Schneider recounted that he had met earlier this year with representatives for a few education organizations, including the Council...


Everybody seems to agree that the United States needs to improve the quality of its math education. There's less consensus, however, on how to get there. A conference scheduled for next month in Washington will focus on that topic, specifically on the math taught in high schools. Hosted by the University of Maryland's Center for Math Education, the two-and-a-half day event will highlight such topics as improving the math curriculum, professional development in high schools, and the essential math skill needed to succeed in college. The conference will be held Sept. 25-27 at the Renaissance M Street Hotel in D.C....


As the world turns its eyes toward China for the upcoming Summer Olympic Games, former W.Va. Gov. Bob Wise has donned a sweatsuit, ready to talk international competition. But in a series of video messages being released over the next two weeks, Wise, the president of the Alliance for Excellent Education, will outline the need for the U.S. to aim to be among the best in the world not just in athletics, but in academics. In his kickoff message, Wise talks about the "Academic Olympics" and the need for high school students to compete on the world stage. "We...


The board that sets policy for the National Assessment of Educational Progress has been meeting in Washington over the past few days, attempting to solve some of the trickiest issues in the world of testing. An ad hoc committee of the National Assessment Governing Board gathered Thursday to consider one such topic: how to bring more uniformity to the proportions of students that states and cities exclude from taking NAEP, or provide with special help known as accommodations, on it. It's not easy, as I discussed in a recent story. States set their own policies on how to deal with ...


Some 500 educators attending the National Reading First Conference here in Nashville this week have signed up for more information about a new national association that will push for legislation and policies based on the tenets of the federal program. State Reading First directors came up with the idea for the National Association for Reading First after learning about plans in Congress to eliminate the $1 billion-a-year grant program, according to Debora Scheffel, who directs the program in Colorado. The organization will promote inclusion of Reading First principles in the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act, and work ...


There's no shortage of cheerleaders among the nearly 6,000 attendees at the National Reading First Conference here in Music City. Calling it the "5th annual celebration of the success of Reading First," Joe Conaty, who directs the program for the U.S. Department of Ed, kicked off the national conference today with a plenary session touting the benefits of the federal reading program, and lamenting its potential demise if Congress proceeds with plans to zero it out in the next budget. Deputy Secretary Ray Simon was up next, shaking his head at the looming cuts, saying Reading First "has ...


Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has vetoed a bill that would have required discussions of climate change to be added to the state's textbooks and curriculum, calling the measure an "overly prescriptive" approach. The Republican governor is no skeptic when it comes to global warming. He speaks often of the dangers of climate change on his state and the country, and he has won praise from environmental advocates for leading a high-profile fight to attempt to get the federal government to allow California to set its own, more stringent auto-emissions standards. The climate-change curriculum legislation was sponsored by Sen. Joe Simitian, a ...


Jim Rubillo has announced that he is resigning as executive director of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics after seven years in that position. NCTM, headquartered in Reston, Va., has had a strong influence on math instruction in the nation's classrooms, dating back decades. During Rubillo's tenure, NCTM released "Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8: A Quest for Coherence" and took an active role in attempting to shape policy at many levels. The organization's president, Hank Kepner, recently informed the board and staff of the 100,000-member organization of Mr. Rubillo's decision. Kepner credited Rubillo for his ...


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments