A growing number of Roman Catholic schools are developing programs that incorporate science, technology, religion, engineering, arts, and math.


South Dakota lawmakers had required that the state not adopt any standards developed by a multi-state consortia.


The latest results suggest that this year's graduating class may not be much more prepared than last year's class for college or a career.


The University of Virginia announced a new five-year program that will award graduates both a bachelor's degree in engineering and a master's in teaching.


Some historians say that focusing on the content changes between the 2014 and 2015 AP U.S. History frameworks misses the larger point: Both documents are significantly better than what came before them.


In New Orleans, a state takeover of most schools ten years ago raised questions about how to preserve the city's strong musical heritage.


The International Literacy Association finds that state standards and course requirements on literacy instruction vary considerably.


Principals and superintendents underestimate how much support there is among parents for K-12 computer science classes, according to a recent survey by Gallup and Google.


Jaclyn Zubrzycki, a former teacher and Education Week reporter, will be focusing on arts, music, civics, finances, STEM, and instruction as Curriculum Matters' new co-author.


Lawmakers drafted legislation to allow about 5,000 students to graduate even though they lost their last chance to take the state-required exit exam.


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