A look at the literacy provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act illustrates just how differently the federal government sees its role in reading instruction than it did 14 years ago.


The Every Student Succeeds Act, which could soon replace the 14-year-old No Child Left Behind law, gives states and districts more opportunities to use federal funds for science, technology, engineering, and math education, advocates say, and is ultimately a huge boon for the subjects.


Some provisions in the bill give states more power over assessment, but others protect federal influence in key ways.


While the U.S. president has spoken about human impact on climate change in very certain terms, a recent study out of Stanford University found that middle school textbooks in use in California schools are sending a different message.


New York has redesigned its Regents algebra test, which students must pass to graduate, to align to the common core. And the scores have consequently plummeted.


The "blend trend" allows states to mix PARCC or Smarter Balanced items with questions from their own vendors, but it comes with a few big cautionary notes.


A researcher says there's evidence that the common core has affected 4th and 8th graders in at least one measurable way: It's got them reading more nonfiction.


Girls outperform boys in reading, but the gender gap shrinks when digital texts are used, according to a new analysis by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.


Finding common core-aligned textbooks is still a challenge for some California schools, even five years after the standards were adopted.


Three girls in Nebraska created an online game aimed at helping their classmates learn more about civics.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments