The Kentucky education commissioner blasted the U.S. Department of Education in a recent blog post for rejecting his state's request for a one-year waiver on science assessments.


In a new set of guiding principles for assessment, the Vermont board calls on Congress to change the No Child Left Behind Act and embrace 'judicious' approaches to testing.


Tennessee students in grades 2-4 will be expected to learn cursive writing starting next year.


The PARCC consortium drops some items from its literacy test, saying that it could still test the standards sufficiently with fewer items.


The state is inviting the public to vote "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" on each standard, and to provide specific, detailed feedback.


A researcher and education professor at Michigan State University laid out his take on four major problems with how the common-core math standards are being implemented.


U.S. Education Secretary identifies bad tests, and too much testing, as key problems, but doesn't provide details yet on what the department might do about them.


As children make the transition from finger-counting to retrieving math facts from memory, their brains begin to change, according to a new study from Stanford University.


Revisions in the U.S. history framework have led to a reduction in multiple-choice items and the addition of a short-answer section.


Despite the many negative associations with automated essay-scoring, there's some evidence it may actually be more effective in changing student behavior than human scoring, Annie Murphy Paul wrote recently in the Hechinger Report.


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