The U.S. Department of Education is allowing Idaho to give only common-core-aligned field tests to students this spring, which means no achievement data will be produced for parents, educators, and the public.


Teachers who want to know what students are thinking as they solve math problems might try having them create screencasts as they work.


A Missouri lawmaker pokes fun at common-core "conspiracy theorists" by requesting a state appropriation to pay for aluminum foil hats.


The American Association of University Women came out in support of the Common Core State Standards, citing a need to close the STEM gender gap.


Dennis Van Roekel tells members in a letter that they "have a right to feel frustrated, upset, and angry about the poor commitment to implementing the standards correctly."


When asked about the most important long-term goals of education, voters place the highest value on building character rather than building the economy. And most don't know what the common core is.


A split in the debate about the common standards shows up starkly in the news coverage of a Kansas lawmaker's views.


The Friday decisions by the department of education bring to 11 the number of states that can avoid "double testing" their students with field tests and their regular state tests, but a decision on California is still outstanding.


The public can now do a final review of the preK-12 arts-education standards—in dance, media arts, music, theatre, and visual arts—proposed by a coalition of arts and education groups.


Today President Barack Obama announced his plans to nominate Jane Chu, who heads a major performing arts center in downtown Kansas City, Mo., as chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments