Kansas chooses to have its state university design its tests rather than using the system being created by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.


In a Michigan report, 12 companies vying for bigger shares of the common-core assessment market disclose new information about their plans, but many fall short of supplying the state with sufficient reassurance about their handling of student data.


Tony Bennett has been hired to help ACT Inc., on Aspire, its new suite of common-core assessments.


New York City's governing body adopts a resolution drafted by anti-testing groups and circulated nationally as model legislation.


A new campaign for Computer Science Education Week is attempting to get 10 million K-12 students to spend an hour learning how to code.


The body that sets policy for NAEP considers revising the way it reports exclusion rates to distinguish between students not permitted to take the test, and those who decline to do so because it doesn't offer the accommodations they need.


Phrasing in the agreements that PARCC and Smarter Balanced signed with the U.S. Department of Education has given data-privacy advocates cause for worry about the sharing of student data.


The National Assessment Governing Board's early attempts to come up with new ways to use students' background information gets immediate pushback from outgoing education statistics chief Jack Buckley.


How do you capture the life of a liberation leader, political prisoner, and president who helped end a nation's system of racial oppression? How do you convey his place in history for students?


As worry swirls around the use and disclosure of student-level data, PARCC issues rules that clarify that it will not share such data with the federal government. Any decisions about sharing that information lies with states, according to the new policy.


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