May 2012 Archives

The extensive grassroots efforts leading to women's right to vote is a compelling portrayal of the fact that social change movements are like rivers with many tributaries. A dynamic, successful social movement is really the confluence of many movements--smaller, more local, narrower or different in focus.


Yesterday, Billy Easton wrote a great Op-ed in The New York Times discussing how Governor Cuomo and his allies are increasing the opportunity gap for many of the state's most disadvantaged students. Tragically, but unsurprisingly, brutal budget cuts have hit poor districts much worse than middle class and wealthy ones.


The future of this country is entrusted in your ability to prepare students for life. The belief that your job is merely to help students obtain an education (signified by receiving a diploma) or get into college is clear proof of a misunderstanding. It is your duty as an educator to raise this question: what is the purpose of the public school system?


Striking university students in Québec are well into their 15th week of continuous protests. Their strike, which began primarily in opposition to student debt and the proposed 75% tuition hike, has since expanded to encompass wider critiques of both the university system itself and larger issues of austerity and neoliberal economic reform.


Transformative change requires self-assured, daring tactics that are, at their heart, driven by love for the community of fellow humans and rage against the denial of human rights and against the system that perpetuates exclusion.


About this series: This post is the 4th in a series on how activists shape history, particularly the “Art of Movement Building.” Guest Blogger Saulo Colon and I, each week, will discuss our continued lessons learned from studying successful movements over the last 100 years. We call these lessons “hypotheses” because we know they represent only some of the lessons and we want you to test them out against your experience and knowledge. We would love to have you as part of this conversation. The examples we use in this series come from many different aspects of a larger human...


Guest blogger Bryant Muldrew shows us some possibilities for a better, qualitative student assessment system, which doesn't rely on the increasingly-discredited regime of standardized tests.


In order to think about what educational reforms we need, we first have to envision the society we want those reforms to help create.


Safety. How do we define it? Can it be provided by metal detectors? Or by searching every "suspicious" character in sight?


Student loans are structural barriers to quality education, meaningful work, and economic contribution for students post-graduation.


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