The Democratic frontrunner in the campaign for the White House has made early-childhood education a high priority in her discussion of education policy.


It's not just plumbers and electricians: Prospective preschool teachers can now learn by doing, thanks to a new apprenticeship program in St. Louis.


The money will be used to fund research, fellowships, and professional development opportunities for early educators.


UPSTART, a Utah-funded program that also got federal Investing in Innovation grant money, gives an early-literacy boost that persists through elementary school, a state study says.


Public preschool spending has surpassed pre-recession levels for the first time since the 2008 downturn, according to new data from the National Institute for Early Education Research.


Zane Wubbena, a doctoral candidate at Texas State University, is studying how brain development affects students' ability to comprehend the math curriculum for their grade level.


Mothers care more only about the next president not entering another war than they do about investing in education.


Congress has approved $294 million in supplemental funding to allow existing Head Start programs to offer full school day and full school year programs.


Early educators, including center directors, make far less than other Colorado professionals with similar degrees, says a report by Qualistar Colorado.


The White House is celebrating federal, state and local initiatives intended to help young children learn more about science, technology, engineering, and math.


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