Last year, there was far more talk than action among legislators and policymakers about expanding early-childhood education. The talk has started again.


Using data and evidence-based practices wisely will help improve the 50-year-old preschool program for low-income children, says a coalition of Head Start advocates and good governance groups.


A study of Tennessee preschool students found that those who were taught by highly rated 1st grade teachers performed better than those who had highly rated teachers but did not attend state preschool.


Scientists have proven what parents and caregivers have known intuitively for thousands of years: Lullabies work better than baby talk for keeping infants calm.


Between 2008 and 2015 the number of nature-focused preschools where children spend much of their time outside has more than tripled.


The Early Years "Ask a Scientist" series yielded some of the most popular blog posts of 2015, as did a number of posts on other research topics.


The Integrating Technology in Early Literacy website highlights more than 30 programs around the country that are using devices such as tablets and web video to enhance literacy instruction.


Part Two: Alison Gopnik, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, takes big philosophical questions and answers them scientifically. In this part of our interview, Gopnik discusses how children learn that other people don't always prefer goldfish snacks.


The city's prekindergarten program is approaching universal access, which was a campaign promise of Mayor Bill de Blasio, who convinced the state legislature to provide $300 million to help launch it.


Part One: Alison Gopnik, a professor at the University of California at Berkley, takes big philosophical questions and answers them scientifically. In the first part of our interview, she talks about how adept young children are at figuring out the physical world.


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