When providers' revenues depend on specific streams of government funding subject to political risk (witness the NCLB reauthorization) taking an expanded view of the market is akin to taking out insurance against business interruption.


If you were an MBA candidate discussing the District of Columbia’s public schools as a case study at the Harvard Business School, would you propose that the Chancellor treat her central office as demoralized troops, or an enemy army? Would you deal with poor performance as a series of individual cases, or would you favor blanket indictments of the organization? If you believed that central office performance was universally poor, would you propose that she dress the troops down in a staff meeting behind closed doors, or in front of the camera for national television? If you found that ...


“[S]chool board OKs charter school at jail,” by Susie Gran in today’s Albuquerque Tribune illustrates that public education agencies are hardly the only source of business for school improvement providers. Federal and state agencies responsible for juvenile justice, workforce training, health and human services, and other government functions have significant needs for the same products, services and programs. More on this over the weekend....


The DC public schools Chancellor needs a central office staff no less than she needs teachers and principals - two groups she's been careful to embrace although they bear as much responsibility for the system's failures as the scapegoats in the bureaucracy.


The Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration Program (CSRDP) sponsored by Democratic Representative David Obey and Republican John Porter, passed into law in 1998. Fencing off a portion of states’ Title I funds, the legislation created a market-based approach to school-level reform. Until it phased out of NCLB I by the Bush Administration in favor of Reading First (RF), the program was implemented in thousands of schools across America. I was heartened to hear that the Miller-McKeon NCLB II Discussion Draft proposed to revive CSR. I was sorely disappointed when I read the Draft’s relevant provisions. Whatever the program is, it’s...


Ravitch argues NCLB I is “fundamentally flawed." She's wrong.


Florida Creates a Market-Based Reading Intervention Program for Failing Schools...


The purpose of these postings has been to suggest that it's not impossible to get started on understanding the real supply side of school improvement.


A brief intense research effort before purchasing a for-profit firm’s offerings, entering into some kind partnering arrangement, or investing in it, is basic due diligence.


edbizbuzz readers are not the only ones navigating the school improvement industry without good maps, most providers are in the same boat.


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