To better understand educational research, start by asking "who?" Who wrote the study; who published it; and who did the authors intend as their audience?


When planning activities for Computer Science Ed Week, focus on fostering students computational thinking and problem-solving skills instead of teaching them to "code."


Almost two-thirds of college students still use blogs, mostly to find information, tips, and step-by-step instructions for work, hobbies, DIY projects, and finances.


As educators, we all possess the power of innovation because we can control our own thoughts, feelings, and actions.


Mimi Ito and Justin Reich are releasing a new report "From Good Intentions to Real Outcomes: Equity by Design in Learning Technologies."


The recently released Worldwide Educating for the Future Index urges governments to reevaluate their education systems and provides a blueprint for change.


How might we create the ideal conditions for professional learning and promote conversations about deeper learning and systemic change?


Before citing research or editorials as a rationale to ban technology, we need to question the underlying assumptions that the authors make about student learning.


Teachers play an essential role in leading changes in teaching and learning in schools.


When reading articles that reference empirical research, we need to examine how the author makes assumptions before considering the study as "proof."


The opinions expressed in EdTech Researcher are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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