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July 01, 2014

Call for Submissions: Youth Stories About Life Online

An opportunity for youth to submit to a ebook about Youth and the Internet from the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and UNICEF.

June 30, 2013

The Person-Click Dataset

Some of the underlying data structures in educational research in online learning environments.

January 18, 2013

A Trailer for Technology in the Classroom

The potential of education technology, in about 90 seconds.

August 16, 2012

Librarians are Completely Awesome

Here's the thing about librarians: they are the only people I know who are incredibly excited TO DO YOUR WORK FOR YOU.

July 31, 2012

What if Constructivist Beliefs and Tech Confidence Don't Make Better Teachers?

Examining tentative results from a study: What if Constructivist Beliefs and Technology Confidence Don't Make Better Tech Teachers?

June 27, 2012

Come Build Community with Me and Facing History (Job Opening)

Facing History is hiring a Program Associate for Online Community and Educator Support, a person who will work very closely with me in the years ahead.

June 18, 2012

When Leftists and Libertarians Agree about Learning Webs

Several weeks ago, I was in a meeting at Berkman with Howard Rheingold who recommended Ivan Illich's Deschooling Society, a remarkably prescient book from 1971 which predicts the rise of technology driven "Learning Webs". These Learning Webs are computer-mediated networks where learners identify their needs, find appropriate peers and mentors to advance their skills, and pursue their own individually-crafted education experience. What Neil Stephenson's Snow Crash did for immersive virtual worlds, Deschooling Society does for education: craft a compelling vision of a near future that we can watch come to pass around us.

May 22, 2012

The Factory Model versus the Creative Agency Classroom

I have a commentary published in this week's Education Week paper titled Use Technology to Upend Traditional Classrooms. In it, I propose three ways of thinking about how emerging technologies can transform the traditional factory model of education. In the factory model, we envision the process of education as the delivery of standardized learning objects into containers (brains) brought by students. One thing we could do with technology is to try to make the factory run more cheaply. For instance, we could have students take self-paced online courses and replace teachers with security guards. Another thing we could do with technology would be to make the factory run faster. If we give each kid their own assembly line, through the personalization of curriculum, then we can deliver standardized learning objects at a paced optimized for each student.

April 30, 2012

Summarizing EdTech in One Slide: Market, Open and Dewey

I'm working on an introductory workshop on digital media and learning for the upcoming Future of Learning Institute run by Harvard's Graduate School of Education and Project Zero. One of my jobs is to introduce participants to the diverse landscape of the field of education technology. One of the biggest problems in the ed-tech space right now is that the phrase "education technology" means very different things to different people and organizations. Here's a 2x2 model that summarizes (and, of course, oversimplifies) the entire education technology space into three groups: Market, Open, and Dewey

April 26, 2012

Guest Presentation: Wikis and the Collaborative Classroom, Just Posting in the Same Place?

Earlier this week I spent an evening, via Skype, with Steven McGee's Teaching with Technology class in the Learning Sciences Department at Northwestern. Steven came to a talk I gave at AERA on the same topic, and he invited me to join his students. Since I was I was basically just doing a webinar with them, I screencast the event so that I could share it here, and so he could share it with sick students who missed class.

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The opinions expressed in EdTech Researcher are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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