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ABC News Veteran Joins Education Week as Correspondent

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Cross-posted from On Air: A Video Blog.

Guest post by Kathleen Kennedy Manzo

Lisa Stark, a veteran broadcast journalist for ABC News and Al Jazeera America, has joined Education Week Video as a correspondent for television and video coverage. 

lisa-stark-280px.jpgThe move reflects the continued expansion of Education Week's multiplatform journalism. EdWeek moved aggressively into video and TV last summer, with the acquisition of Learning Matters TV.

Education Week, the flagship publication of the Bethesda, Md.-based nonprofit publisher Editorial Projects in Education, has produced about a dozen feature segments for the PBS NewsHour's weekly education segment Making the Grade over the past 10 months. Education Week's reporters, editors, and producers have collaborated on stories ranging from the resolution of special education lawsuits in Los Angeles to schools' efforts to ensure a safe environment for Muslim students in St. Cloud, Minn., and the push for high-speed broadband to support student learning in Calhoun County, Miss.

Lisa brings more than three decades of experience in television news, and has received numerous awards, including two national Emmys for her reporting on "The Millennium" and "Broken Pension Promises," as well as a George Foster Peabody Award and Alfred DuPont Award for coverage related to the 9/11 attacks.

She previously covered the U.S. Supreme Court and federal regulatory agencies, reporting extensively on transportation, consumer affairs, and drug and food safety.  Among her many assignments, she covered the 9/11 attacks, the Oklahoma City bombing, the space shuttle Columbia disaster, the Ford-Firestone recall, and the Vioxx controversy. In education, Lisa has covered the abuse of ADHD drugs among college students, the 50th anniversary of the federal Head Start program, and efforts in the nation's capital to improve minority students' interactions with law enforcement.

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