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Is Education the Most Important Civil Rights Issue of All?

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Education is the single most important asset when it comes to equal Civil Rights, according to First Lady Michelle Obama. She made the remarks while addressing guests at the White House celebrating Black History Month -- specifically celebrating the women of the Civil Rights movement. Mrs. Obama highlighted powerful women like Charlayne Hunter-Gault and Carlotta Walls LaNier who both faced the national spotlight for wanting an equal education during the height of the Civil Rights movement.

"Thanks to their sacrifice, there are no angry mobs gathering outside our schools. Nobody needs a military escort to get to class, but that doesn't mean that our children don't still face struggles when it comes to education," said the First Lady, as reported by the Associated Press. 

She went on to say that quality education is the "single most important civil rights issue" of contemporary society, crediting her own education to her successes in life.

The First Lady seconds what I've long held to be a truth: inequality for Americans starts in our K-12 schools. The students with more resources and access to educational opportunities fare better in life. This is not to say that any one of our students is a lost cause, though. All schools should strive to elevate the learning experiences for each student, no matter what the circumstances.

Better distribution of federal funds and tax dollars is also something that needs to take place to ensure that all students have the same educational opportunities as their peers. Better equality in education will translate to more equal footing throughout society.

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The opinions expressed in Education Futures: Emerging Trends in K-12 are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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