If we truly want educational technology to take root in schools and finally live up to the promise we've been expecting for more than a decade, schools need to develop a cadre of well-trained tech instructional coaches.


A pedagogical pathway is paved with "engaging (learning about) the world," and "changing it for the better." What now is emerging is the possibility that pedagogical savvy and political action may make for a surprising combination with students as a force for change.


Many people may believe a coach is the one with all of the power, but true coaching can offer learning opportunities for the coach and the person being coached. Here are four areas where I did some learning.


School district governance is one of the most misunderstood and underappreciated functions in education. Here are four areas boards need to know to be successful, according to retired executive director of the California School Boards Association Davis Campbell.


Instructional leadership is easy to talk about but hard to put into practice, which is where coaching comes in. Here's how, according to Peter DeWitt.


As soon as a student receives the classification of special education, that label can create a glass ceiling for them. However, that label has long created a glass ceiling for their special education teachers.


Every so often I love when I get into a space of learning where I can sit down, read a book, and take multiple notes, writes Peter DeWitt.


Let's give up the search for "best practices" in grading. Best practices are often not as great as we are told.


Recently, several hundred leaders filled out a survey stating they were confident in their ability to be instructional leaders. Many teachers filling out a like survey said, "Not so fast."


There is a lot of pushback from critics when teachers and leaders try to address the social-emotional-learning needs of students. The reality is that social-emotional learning is not only easy to address, it's important to do so, and this post explains why.


The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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