Walkthroughs are complicated during the best of times, so why should leaders consider doing them during remote, hybrid, and in-person sessions during COVID-19? There are at least three reasons why.


As teachers and students prepare for the fall, regardless of how they will come back together, social-emotional issues will need to be addressed for learning to occur.


In the United States, we lament the lack of diversity in STEM fields and in teacher education, but many of our actions as educators continue to "weed out" students from nondominant communities and those who are differently abled.


During this time of what we hope will be a great white awakening, we need to expose our children to positive role models who look like them. And it needs to happen more than just one month a year.


Equity has been a focus of constant conversations during COVID-19. How do students receive an equitable education, especially when it comes to literacy? N.Y.C. officials responded in a big way.


After Tom Guskey appeared on Education Week's web show A Seat at the Table, where he talked about grading and assessment, educators on social media asked follow-up questions about Guskey's philosophy on retakes. Here's his answer.


School communities are devising numerous ways to bring back students in the fall. Still, there are really only three instructional options for teachers.


Principals tend to say they want their teachers to do more inquiry and less direct instruction. Perhaps those principals should model what it looks like? Here's how.


Many people are unsure about what they can do about educational issues relating to race as well as the pandemic. Giving the people who can help us a seat at the table is a good start.


During the pandemic, instructional coaches find themselves working with teachers on many issues. One of the most critical they are addressing now is how to find a sense of peace, balance, and rejuvenation.


The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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