Instructional coaching is an important method of helping any teacher who wants to become better at their craft meet that goal. Unfortunately, there are districts that approach coaching the wrong way. Is virtual coaching a way to still be coached without the political aspects that can come with instructional coaching?


Drama plays out in schools every day, because schools are complex places with a diverse thinking set of adults and students who converge in them every day. It's time to take on the drama, and see if leadership coaching can help meet the many challenges leaders face.


The rhetoric around education has not always been kind, and it just got a whole lot worse because of a school's desire to bring back paddling. It's pathetic and there are better alternatives. Here are 6 of them.


When questions arise about some aspect of assessment or grading, educators today seldom turn to reliable sources of research or evaluation evidence. They don't look for well-designed studies that have been published in reputable journals. Instead they turn to books, blogs, and social media as their primary sources of information. Basing policies and practices on the opinions gathered from books, blogs, and social media is a sure ticket to disaster.


Many instructional coaches enter into the position with high hopes to have an impact on teachers and students, but many soon find out that the position becomes a dumping ground for "Duties as assigned."


The mental health of school counselors, nurses, school leaders, and teachers are at risk, and they may only need 10 minutes to help alleviate their stress.


Schools can't afford to ignore the news media until a negative issue takes place.


Recently, NAESP released a thorough study explaining the many challenges of school leadership. In an effort to help meet the challenges leaders search for professional development opportunities. Is leadership coaching a form of professional development they are forgetting?


As we approach a year after the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., what has changed? How do we talk to students about it?


Let's provide more opportunities in school so children learn how to make decisions and develop an internal locus of control. This way a child can influence events and outcomes in their own lives and in return, we will have more children who are potentially less anxious and depressed, all which inhibits their true potential as human beings.


The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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