The movie Hidden Figures exposed us all to a piece of our own history where women played an integral part. A new book reminds us of an important moment in sports where women were center stage, and more students need to know about it.


We ask students to be self-directed learners and take risks, but often leaders and teachers don't take those same type of risks and seem to want the answer before they really know the question to answer.


Makerspaces bring students into a world where they can curate their own learning and yet many schools aren't on board with having them. Here are some reasons why schools should change that mindset.


We all have them in our lives. They have spent years perfecting their craft on correcting the way they...and everyone else around them...talk. And they want to be able to use their grammar intelligence on anyone they can. We have bigger fish to fry.


District leaders have long had the reputation for sitting in their ivory towers and making all the rules. Here are a few ways one district leader is shattering that myth.


Standards-based grading is sending a message to some parents that their children are average. This comes as a shock to those parents who have always heard their children exceeded expectations with traditional grading. We are at a crossroads with grading, and we should be clear on what standards-based grading really means.


Too often leaders don't involve teachers in the decision making process and then get mad at them for always asking what it is that leaders want them to do when it comes to any decision at all. Research shows that when teachers are authentically involved, the solutions to problems get stronger.


What are the formative five skills for success and why do they matter to students? Find out here.


Stephen Covey created a list of habits that he found true in highly successful people. Unfortunately there are also leaders who have the 7 habits of highly ineffective leaders. Read here to see where your leadership falls.


As states finalize new school accountability plans under ESSA, measures of school climate have received increasing attention. Many states have included school climate as a "non-academic" indicator of school quality in their recently drafted plans. But what does that mean?


The opinions expressed in Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments