We often approach interviews as a "desexualized version of a date" and hire from the gut. There are many reasons why that's the wrong way to go.


Too many times students are forced to do an activity that surrounds a concept they already know. The activities focus on doing something, rather than learning something. We need to stop doing that.


Feedback is easier to give than to get. Here are a few ways to take it all in without letting it ruin your day.


In a recent blog post, Shirley Clarke wrote about how ability grouping doesn't work, and it raised quite a stir. I would suggest that mixed-ability grouping doesn't either, because many people use it by name alone.


The challenge for all schools is to decide what story the data they collect will tell them, and this is one way to help weed that out.


Why is it that straight teachers can talk about their lives, but as soon as a gay teacher talks about hers it has to be about pushing an agenda?


Many classrooms still look like they did yesterday and yesteryear. We need to be talking about tomorrow's classrooms today, and there is a venue where this will be happening, and some awesome educators leading the discussion.


Why is it that when we talk about ELL/ENL and indigenous students we seem to focus on what they can't do rather than what they can do?


How do we get leaders and policymakers to step away from the autopsy model of assessment that state tests seem to focus on?


We consume more than we conserve, and there are some pretty simple things schools can do to teach students how to conserve. And it starts with Nude Food Mondays.


The opinions expressed in Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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