What if school leaders made sure they walked 10,000 steps while in school, and paid close attention to the relationships they could build along every step?


Today's guest post is a personal story written by a teacher who lost her job after changing genders.


So often, teachers and leaders get trained separately. Wouldn't it be better to have everyone in the same room so they can have authentic dialogue that will help them get to the heart of the issue, and create action steps to move on?


Recently, Peter Gray wrote about the 'good enough' parent who does not excel at everything but works hard to understand their child. Should we have the same opinion when it comes to teachers?


Schools seem to try to change a lot for a variety of reasons. But, in the spirit of Simon Sinek, do we really know why we do what we do?


If we aren't providing evidence of our impact, what are we doing?


Collaboration is a popular word these days, but our ideas on what it means to collaborate vary widely. Before we truly collaborate we need to understand what it means, and truly understand why we are doing it in the first place.


A lot has been written, both good and bad, about 'Grit," but it's the hard learning that makes learning so good.


Many times initiatives fail because they lack coherence. Michael Fullan and Joanne Quinn show us how to do that.


A 2013 article in Forbes Magazine suggested that only 8 percent of people follow through on their New Year's resolutions because they are often too lofty. Here are 9 easy places to start.


The opinions expressed in Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments