There are lots of people who go into leadership positions but never make it further than focusing on their administrative duties. There are at least three reasons why this happens.


Most educators remain quiet, cemented in the belief that their voice is not valued enough to be heard. this is one of the major reasons why we must foster teacher leadership.


The growth mindset is a worldwide phenomenon but unfortunately it has a very low effect size. Educational researcher John Hattie addresses the misperceptions of the growth mindset that contributes to that low effect size in this guest blog.


Who is really responsible for summer slide?


It's easy for leaders to make a grand plan in July when things are relatively quiet, but it's much harder to make those plans work when it's in the middle of January.


While skillfully shared feedback can catapult learning to new heights, poorly offered feedback can have minimal impact, or worse, can potentially have negative impact, leading to disengagement and resentment.


You really want to hear about the best part of student voice? This blog is written by two high school students who helped transform their high school master schedule.


We have all heard the phrase, "living vicariously through someone else," but can it be applied to learning too? Actually, research shows it can.


Asking different questions isn't enough if teachers aren't listening to the answers students provide. Here are 3 ways to have authentic differentiation in the classroom.


NPR recently published an article about an assistant principal who left the teaching ranks to make more money. Many leaders don't leave for the money, and what's the problem if they do choose to leave the classroom?


The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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