Educational words are highly important. Unfortunately, it seems lately that people change the words or ignore valuable established research to brand themselves and their ideas. How can we find a better way to respect those that came before us at the same time we share our voices in education?


Do IEP's single you out because you're different or help you become a better learner?


There are 3 big time killers, and we do them all the time.


Tschannen-Moran & Gareis 2004 write, "The purpose of leadership is to facilitate group goal attainment by establishing and maintaining an environment favorable to group performance." That's an important job, and we need leaders with a sense of self-efficacy to do it.


Teacher talk still dominates high school classrooms, but it doesn't have to, and here are a few reasons why.


As important as being connected and learning how to use Smartphones appropriately is important, so is putting them down and finding connections in other ways. There are at least five other ways to be connected, and they're important.


We have been hoaxed by our students to think they are tech savvy, when in reality they may be more text savvy.


Too often principals ask teachers and coaches to do something that they aren't going to do themselves. Is video one of them?


It's "Teacher Appreciation Week," but do teachers really appreciate each other?


Inequity is confronting and needs to be confronted. It is injurious when you experience it and it is jarring when you witness it. But not enough educators are doing anything about it.


The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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