International students and their families bring millions of dollars not only to U.S. higher education institutions, but also the communities they are located in. But do we provide these students with the supports they need to succeed in our system?


Research shows that investing in high-quality afterschool programs addresses many of the challenges that Minnesota and many other states face in helping youth succeed in school, work, and life.


While on the surface, it may seem that U.S. history is one of the least global of all subject areas, America's past is inextricably tied to that of other nations.


When developing learning environments that foster respect for religious diversity, it's important to address the experiences of religiously unaffiliated students.


Community organizations incorporate global learning into their afterschool programs in a number of ways.


Across the country, afterschool programs are looking at global learning as an approach to engage youth, enhance quality, and advocate for the value of learning beyond school.


Workforce development, the skills gap, talent pipeline--these are all current buzzwords in U.S. education. But how are these challenges being tackled around the world?


Increasing number of states are adopting Seals of Biliteracy - hear about the experience of Illinois.


This week is International Education Week and we want to honor it by taking a look at what is happening nationally.


A look at how internationalization of teacher education plays out abroad.


The opinions expressed in Global Learning are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments