Students at high schools with large low-income populations could be at a disadvantage when applying to college because of a little-known document that's part of the process: each high school's "school profile."


ACT has stopped telling colleges whether students who took the admissions exam have disabilities, a practice that sparked a lawsuit last summer.


At nearly half a million students' high schools, half or more of the freshmen disappear before graduation, and federal law doesn't require those schools to get better, according to a new study.


California rejects a plan to let school districts substitute the SAT for the Smarter Balanced exam.


The Common Application acquires "Reach Higher," a signature college-access initiative started by former First Lady Michelle Obama.


A pair of new surveys shows deep skepticism about the value of college-admissions exams among high school counselors and college-admissions leaders. Both groups also worry about too much pressure to take AP courses, and lack of equal access to those classes.


A new study finds that students perform well in college classes when their placements in those courses are based on multiple factors, including high school grades.


Schools that rely most heavily on credit recovery produce bigger increases in their graduation rates, even though their students perform poorly on state achievement tests. The finding adds fuel to the controversy about graduation-rate inflation.


Federal education officials have notified Connecticut that they can't fully approve its use of the SAT as a high school achievement test. It's a glimpse of where the college-entrance exam could falter in its bid to gain new ground in the K-12 world.


You might have heard that there were problems with the August SAT exam. Here's what you need to know.


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