The National Assessment Governing Board has voted to skip the next administration of the National Assessment of Educational Progress in 2021 because of potential logistics and financial problems caused by the coronavirus pandemic.


The long-term risks to children of remaining in isolation are rapidly outpacing the health risks associated with reopening schools, according to new guidance by the nation's pediatricians.


A New York University study finds that the women who go into male-dominated science fields tend to be only the most high-achieving, but poor math and science grades and test scores don't deter young men by anywhere near as much.


A new analysis by University of California, Los Angeles, researchers suggests disruptive incidents in that district are increasingly related to mental health needs, and that Black students are significantly more likely to think school police escalate problems on campus than to think the officers made them safer at school.


The congressionally mandated tests dubbed the "Nation's Report Card," have measured the progress of U.S. students in reading and math for five decades, come fire, flood, and budget cuts. But the combination of a global pandemic and nationwide economic instability could throw off the 2021 National Assessment of Educational Progress.


UNESCO's annual report on global education progress finds countries need to make more effort to include marginalized students, particularly in the United States.


Thanks to pandemic-related test disruptions and a push for racial equity, efforts to remove college admissions tests such as the ACT and SAT from application requirements are gaining momentum this year.


Interviews with more than 70 school resource officers showed striking differences in how they perceived their jobs, with officers in a more affluent district seeing themselves as protectors and their counterparts in a more diverse district viewing students as threatening.


Teachers cover significantly less algebra or advanced content in algebra classes in schools with mostly black students than schools with mostly white or Latino students.


They may be social distancing, but teachers, principals, and superintendents worry their schools will be seriously cramped for space come fall, according to the EdWeek Research Center's sixth coronavirus-focused survey.


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