Some long-empty spots on a board that advises the U.S. Department of Education on research matters may soon be filled.


A new study finds that living in poverty before age 5 is linked to lower earnings 30 or more years later.


First graders who are retained for another year enjoy some short-term social and psychological benefits, a new study shows, but some of those advantages evaporate later.


The federal What Works Clearinghouse weighs in on a newsmaking, 16-state study that gave students in traditional schools a learning edge over their charter school counterparts.


A report released this morning by the Fordham Institute says 2,817 schools across the country are "public private schools" because they enroll almost no low-income children.


A Texas-based blog reports that Houston Superintendent Terry Grier wants to make the school system a hub for research on what works in Houston's schools.


A federal review offers a vote of confidence on a study of Experience Corps, a national program that recruits older adults to work in needy schools.


The president's budget request offers a glimpse of some new federal studies in the works.


A first-of-a-kind study found that students who attended charter high schools were more likely to graduate and go on to college than their counterparts in traditional public schools.


A new paper from Consortium for Policy Research in Education suggests that, if teachers are going to make use of results from interim assessments, supports are needed.


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