Researchers take a tempered look at efforts in Mapleton, Colo., to replace the city's only high school with six to seven smaller ones.


Inside Higher Ed reports on an allegation that the U.S. Department of Education's top FERPA watchdog may have been fired for political reasons.

The U.S. Department of Education's main research agency is seeking proposals for R&D centers, research, and training projects.


While educators are making progress in narrowing achievement gaps between students, "excellence gaps" are stagnating or growing for the most able learners.


An earlier entry on community colleges sparks some debate in the blogosphere and some new findings.


Researchers offer evidence to suggest that housing values rise in areas close to districts with good schools when states enact inter-district public school choice programs.


A quick glance at the Obama administration's 2011 budget request reveals some spending increases for research, development, and evaluation.


The American Institute for Economic Research reports that costs for education-related products and services grew at three times the inflation rate over the last 20 years.


The President, in his State of the Union address, reiterated his support for community college but a study shows that low-income students have a better chance of graduating in private, career colleges.


A study in Science Daily finds that ambidextrous children are more likely than right- or left-handed children to have school difficulties.


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