We wonder if in teaching history as a story of facts, we have scrubbed it clean of the emotional story that carries the important messages.


As a leader in any school, it is important to learn and study what great leaders do and have done. One thing that must be learned is that great leaders surround themselves with great people, and then get out of their way and let them do their jobs.


The schedule should be developed to support the curricular needs of the teaching and learning.Teaching and learning should not be forced into a schedule's demands, but they have been and still do.


As school budgets are being developed, in systems where funds are decreasing and student population as well or where priorities are shifting, excessing personnel often becomes a leader's reality.


The difficulty lies in mediating the arbitrary, but important landmark standards, and the variability of children's readiness to meet them without the adults using labels to separate.


We are not suggesting that there is one system that is the answer. Rather we are suggesting that it is time for many to stop and assess the systems that are being used, how they are being used and if there is a better way.


Many of today's schools in the U.S. were built 50-60 years ago. These buildings weren't designed for change - they're very static places. This has become a big problem for the U.S. since education looks very different today and continues to evolve, as it should.


The professional conscience of every great educator guides them to prepare children with an education that develops the skills and knowledge to be successful in the world. Not our current world, mind you, but the one in which they will live as graduates of our systems.


What do we know, what can we be sure of, and what do we need to learn about how it feels to be a child in our schools?


While school leaders are focused on the obligation to keep students safe, these opportunities allow us to continue educating students about both following rules and regulations and civil disobedience.


The opinions expressed in Leadership 360 are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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