A 21st century shift is the manner in which teaching and learning takes place, the emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math, and the relationship subjects have with each other.


We are familiar with the leadership turnover process. It happens with some frequency in school districts across the country.


Charters or vouchers won't matter when students are receiving a quality education where their needs are being met and their limitations are merely gaps that are being closed.


As educators, we may hope to be colorblind. But is there something beyond being colorblind that will make us better and stronger leaders for children of all colors and cultures? Too often we see our good intentions rather than the real lives of others.


In formal/academic learning what often gets in the way, for children and professionals, is the lack of time and effort given to understanding and agreeing to the objectives and standards to which we are striving.


We observe a growing practice of dismissing civility and respectful dialogue under the label of 'political correctness'. We disagree. Our society will be well served and well lead if we carry a concern about the 'other'.


What is the truth now has a new meaning and, once we learn how to identify the truth ourselves, we need to teach the children.


While asking teachers to grow and develop their technology skills, shift their practice, change their schedules, connect differently with students and parents and other teachers, leaders cannot stand on the sidelines as cheerleaders.


We need more Princess Leia's. The views one holds about the role of women in society is a deeply held personal belief that is played out daily in our actions. In schools, those actions are watched carefully, are given meaning and influence students.


School leaders have the obligation to focus professional development to support the ideas and concepts essential in these subjects and their relationships to each other.


The opinions expressed in Leadership 360 are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments