No matter whether homework is the opener of the conversation or some other topic is catalytic to a reflection on current practice how things fit into the bigger picture has to be considered.


Guest blogger Josh Schachter writes "We will need to develop even greater abilities to listen to each other beyond the political rhetoric, to empathize and collaborate across institutional, disciplinary, hierarchical, and socioeconomic boundaries."


When attention turns to measuring the factors that contribute to successful learning, people will feel better about their schools, and want to support them as far more than 'good enough'.


Let's proceed as if it is a good thing to be compassionate and kind as a person or nation. Those qualities are not mutually exclusive from strength.


A building-wide, district-wide discussion about how to react to those who are wearing pink hats is worthwhile.


A 21st century shift is the manner in which teaching and learning takes place, the emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math, and the relationship subjects have with each other.


We are familiar with the leadership turnover process. It happens with some frequency in school districts across the country.


Charters or vouchers won't matter when students are receiving a quality education where their needs are being met and their limitations are merely gaps that are being closed.


As educators, we may hope to be colorblind. But is there something beyond being colorblind that will make us better and stronger leaders for children of all colors and cultures? Too often we see our good intentions rather than the real lives of others.


In formal/academic learning what often gets in the way, for children and professionals, is the lack of time and effort given to understanding and agreeing to the objectives and standards to which we are striving.


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