The fight over the rights of undocumented students has its origins in Tyler, a northeast Texas city where municipal leaders feared their school system would be overrun with immigrant families and students.


An estimated 15,000 educators in U.S. schools are recipients of DACA, the Obama-era program that allows immigrants who were brought to the United States as children to avoid deportation.


Native-language assessments may more fully reflect what English-language learners know and can do academically after months away from school. But not all states offer them.


With schools unable to conduct in-person evaluations, schools must find new ways to determine if students need English-language-learner support services.


More than 40 organizations have signed on to a letter to Congress, requesting $1 billion in aid to help districts and states meet the needs of the nation's nearly 5 million English-learners.


In five northern U.S. states, black students comprise more than a fifth of ELL enrollment.


English-learners often lack access to technology at home, experts and educators say, and their teachers are less likely to assign them to use digital learning resources outside of class.


The number of English-learner students in U.S. schools has increased 28 percent since 2000; 43 of 50 states have experienced an uptick in enrollment, federal data indicate.


More than four years after the passage of ESSA, English-language-learner education policies across the country remain "disjointed and inaccessible," a new report concludes.


The extra work that many dual-language bilingual educators take on "too often goes unrecognized and is never remunerated," a new small-scale study concludes.


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