April 2010 Archives

Arizona's department of education is requiring some school districts to reassign teachers with heavy accents or ungrammatical English to classes where they won't be teaching English-language learners, according to The Wall Street Journal.


Charlene Rivera, a member of the Working Group on ELL Policy, argued for the common standards process to give more attention to ELLs at a Senate hearing on the ESEA.


The National Council of La Raza and Population Reference Bureau have compiled statistics about Latino children's presence in this country and their well-being to make the case that this group of children deserve focused attention by policymakers.


The next two weeks bring three chances to participate in free live events offering information either about English-language learners who have disabilities or how to implement "response to intervention" with ELLs.


The New York Times provides a collection of lesson plans and ideas on how to teach about immigration through The Learning Network.


Gaps in social, economic, and legal status are greater between different immigrant groups than between native whites and blacks in the United States, according to two researchers at the University of California, Irvine.


Linda Greenhouse protests the enactment of an anti-immigrant law in Arizona by speculating how undocumented school-age children in this country might be treated if the U.S. Supreme Court hadn't ruled in favor of scuh children in Plyer v. Doe in 1982.


On May 5, Education Week will host a free Web chat featuring two researchers who specialize in how to implement "response to intervention" for English-language learners.


The Illinois board of education is poised to vote on regulations that would require public school districts to provide English-learners who are preschoolers with the same kinds of services they give to ELLs in grades K-12.


If you're a Spanish speaker, take a humor break and enjoy this video about a revolutionary product called "book."


U.S. Senators Dick Durbin and Richard Lugar have asked U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano to halt deportations of undocumented students who would benefit from the DREAM Act.


An opinion writer in the National Post argues that Canada's federal policy to support two official languages, French and English, hasn't worked.


A feature article in the Voice of San Diego discusses the pros and cons of newcomer centers for immigrant or refugee teens.


Schools and community colleges in El Cajon, Calif., can't keep up with the demand for adult ESL and education from Iraqi refugees.


Larry Ferlazzo's new book, English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies that Work, gives ideas about how to nurture in students good qualities of learners and leaders.


Florida's chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens charges that a bill that would create a merit-pay system would hurt teachers of ELLs.


English-learners in 1st and 2nd grade participating in bilingual education programs in California score substantially lower on the state's English-proficiency test than ELLs in other kinds of programs, a picture that changes for grades 3-5.


First Focus, a bipartisan children's advocacy group in Washington put out a report this month showing that when an immigrant parents is detained or deported, his or her children often end up in the child welfare system.


Claude Goldenberg, an education professor at Stanford University, writes in a commentary that a "near-exclusive focus" by researchers on the language of instruction used for English-learners has resulted in a limited understanding of other areas affecting such students.


A study comparing bilingual education and English immersion that followed students for as long as five years has found that Spanish-speaking children learn to read English equally well by the 4th grade with either method.


The United States has received Iraqis, Burmese, and Bhutanese in larger numbers in 2010 than any other refugee groups.


Aida Qalqui, the director of teacher development at WestEd, is the guest tomorrow for a free Webinar about how to provide coherent and holistic professional development to teachers who work with ELLs.


Test scores for ELLs in math and reading are rising in many states but that finding from the Center on Education Policy comes with caveats that ELL data is not necessarily accurate.


Education columnist Jay Mathews tells what happened to the only teenage character in 'Stand and Deliver' who was based on a real-life person.


Some state advocacy organizations for English-language learners have formed a new coalition, the Alliance for Multilingual Multicultural Education.


The Working Group on ELL Policy and the National Council of State Title III Directors are becoming more active in the nation's capital in expressing views on ELL policy, while other once-active groups have become silent.


Jaime Escalante, the Bolivian-born teacher who became famous for teaching calculus to Mexican-American students and died this week, was an opponent of bilingual education.


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